Thursday, September 25, 2014

Another Review of a Review of the RS Aero





I see that Yachts and Yachting have now published a review of the RS Aero.

It may be a little biased because it seems it was written by Pete Barton who is also the class manager of the recently formed RS Aero Class Association. But let's see what he has to say that hasn't already been reported elsewhere…

It's light. Yeah, yeah, yeah. We get that. And all it means on and off the water.

Some interesting explanations of the design concept. Maybe I missed some of this before? Carbon in the high load areas. Transom angled to ensure "bow up" planing downwind. Gunwhales help deflect spray. Knuckle on the daggerboard to reduce downwind drag. All good stuff.

You can get it to plane upwind if you crack off a little. There has been a lot of derision about the "upwind planing" claims in some online forums. I will be interested to try this out for myself when I get a chance.

"After a beat across the Solent the backs of my thighs remained comfortable …. I don't see any need for hiking pads." Now that's impressive. I hate wearing hiking pads which are pretty much of a necessity on the flat deck of the Laser.

Gybing was "simple."

Getting back into the boat after a capsize sounds like it may be a bit tricky for a heavier, less than agile sailor. Sort of what I expected for such a light hull. Again I look forward to trying this. If all else fails, climbing in over the stern may be the best option for the agility-challenged.

Bring it on!


11 comments:

Michael O'Brien said...

I want one. Christmas is coming ...

Tillerman said...

Go for it Michael.

Anonymous said...

gosh, it's too much about the aero, it will never become a big class!

Tillerman said...

You may be right "gosh". I don't expect to see as many Aeros sold as Lasers in my lifetime, or Aero regattas as big as Laser regattas. But I don't pine for events with 517 boats any more these days. If there are some events not too far away that have 10-20 boats on the start line I will be perfectly happy.

Anonymous said...

You can always race at club level, I doubt that you have that many Lasers in your club :)

Tillerman said...

I don't belong to a club. Most seasons I have sailed with Laser Fleet 413 in Newport which sails from November to April and which regularly has 30-40 boats racing.

Joe Rousé said...

Want a small class? Repeat after me, "Force 5." ;)

Tillerman said...

The Force 5 Class isn't small, it's minuscule.

I don't WANT a small class. But I am realistic to know that it will be many years before the RS Aero class is bigger than the Laser class. But, beyond a certain point, sheer size of class doesn't appeal to me. Some of my friends are traveling this week to sail in France at the 500+ boat Laser Masters Worlds. Laser Masters sailing has never been healthier. But I don't need to sail at a 500+ boat regatta to have fun.

I predict that by the end of 2015 there will be more active RS Aero sailors in North America than Force 5 sailors. I also predict that the 2016 RS Aero North Americans will have a larger attendance than the 2016 Force 5 North Americans. If I am wrong I will buy Joe Rousé a beer in any bar of his choice in Newport RI.

Anonymous said...

The problem for RS Aero is that Laser is pretty damn close to the perfect "classic" sailing dinghy. With classic I mean no carbon fibre, foiling etc..
Laser is love, Laser is LIFE

Classical Scholar said...

Rome was pretty much the perfect empire too. Until it wasn't.

Anonymous said...

No empire rules forever but the Laser is not out of it's golden age yet. Not for long.

Post a Comment